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Paddle Shaft Repair

Repairing a paddle shaft is very similar to creating a set of split paddles. I have a pair of Werner Players that were pretty much brand new but had snapped near the right hand blade. The technique I use here could be used to repair the shaft on pretty much any paddle and could even be used to shorten or adjust the feather on a sound paddle.

Paddle Shaft Repair

The first task was to clean up the two exposed ends of the shaft. I have a bike steering tube cutting guide that is ideal for this job as the cut is clean and perpendicular to the shaft. Doing this probably lost around 3cm from the overall length of the paddle.

Paddle Shaft Repair

I used a hacksaw with a standard blade to cut the shaft.

Paddle Shaft Repair

Once cleaned the spigot was sanded down to size and I added several 5mm holes to aid with the bonding of the glue. I used rapid fix epoxy glue and glued all parts in place.

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I then used another set of paddles to get the feather set just right. The paddles were then taped up and put to one side to cure. Around 20 minutes later I cleaned up the join ready for a fresh layer of epoxy to ensure the seal was nice and water tight.

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Around £10 = a saved set of paddles.

7 Comments

  1. Unsponsored

    June 16, 2013 at 10:19 pm

    It’s been a few hours since I left the paddle/glue to setup. Super strong repair. Feels pretty good and the paddle length is still very usable.

  2. What did you use as the spigot?

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      June 19, 2013 at 6:22 pm

      A carbon shaft of the correct diameter. They are sold by some kayak shops as spigots for paddles.

  3. Could you mention which shops have them available?

  4. is the spigot made of wood ?

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